agooddaytodie
"On the shelves were the books bound in a cardboard-like material, pale, like tanned human skin, and the manuscripts were intact. In spite of the room’s having been shut up for many years, the air seemed fresher than in the rest of the house. Everything was so recent that several weeks later, when Úrsula went into the room with a pail of water and a brush to wash the floor, there was nothing for her to do. Aureliano Segundo was deep in the reading of a book. Although it had no cover and the title did not appear anywhere, the boy enjoyed the story of a woman who sat at a table and ate nothing but kernels of rice, which she picked up with a pin, and the story of the fisherman who borrowed a weight for his net from a neighbor and when he gave him a fish in payment later it had a diamond in its stomach, and the one about the lamp that fulfilled wishes and about flying carpets. Surprised, he asked Úrsula if all that was true and she answered him that it was, that many years ago the gypsies had brought magic lamps and flying mats to Macondo.
“What’s happening,” she sighed, “is that the world is slowly coming to an end and those things don’t come here any more.””
Good bye to Gabriel García Márquez, who died of pneumonia on April 17, 2014, aged 87…

"On the shelves were the books bound in a cardboard-like material, pale, like tanned human skin, and the manuscripts were intact. In spite of the room’s having been shut up for many years, the air seemed fresher than in the rest of the house. Everything was so recent that several weeks later, when Úrsula went into the room with a pail of water and a brush to wash the floor, there was nothing for her to do. Aureliano Segundo was deep in the reading of a book. Although it had no cover and the title did not appear anywhere, the boy enjoyed the story of a woman who sat at a table and ate nothing but kernels of rice, which she picked up with a pin, and the story of the fisherman who borrowed a weight for his net from a neighbor and when he gave him a fish in payment later it had a diamond in its stomach, and the one about the lamp that fulfilled wishes and about flying carpets. Surprised, he asked Úrsula if all that was true and she answered him that it was, that many years ago the gypsies had brought magic lamps and flying mats to Macondo.

“What’s happening,” she sighed, “is that the world is slowly coming to an end and those things don’t come here any more.””

Good bye to Gabriel García Márquez, who died of pneumonia on April 17, 2014, aged 87…

kdo

Herbie Mann: Norwegian Wood - from The Wailing Dervishes, 1967

Personnel: Bass – Reggie Workman; Bass [Fender] – Steve Knight; Clarinet – Hachig T. Kazarian; Drums – Bruno Carr; Flute - Herbie Mann; Goblet Drum [Dümbek] – Moulay “Ali” Hafid; Oud – Chick Ganimian; Vibraphone [Vibraharp] – Roy Ayers; Zither – Esber Köprücü

(via kdo)
Birthday of Armenian-American painter, Arshile Gorky - April  15, 1904 - 1948…
Arshile Gorky: Summation, 1947 - Pencil, pastel, and charcoal on buff paper mounted on composition board (MoMA)
“‘This is a world’, Gorky said of Summation. But it is an ambiguous world. The plant– and animal–like forms that appear to blossom, flop, poke, and tickle each other defy identification, even while their forms are crisp and clear. Gorky’s interest in the Surrealist practice of spontaneous and unplanned ‘automatic’ drawing freed and mobilized his line, allowing him to create what Surrealist leader André Breton called ‘hybrids’, or linear units with multiple metaphoric meanings. - MoMA text on-line

Birthday of Armenian-American painter, Arshile Gorky - April  15, 1904 - 1948…

Arshile Gorky: Summation, 1947 - Pencil, pastel, and charcoal on buff paper mounted on composition board (MoMA)

“‘This is a world’, Gorky said of Summation. But it is an ambiguous world. The plant– and animal–like forms that appear to blossom, flop, poke, and tickle each other defy identification, even while their forms are crisp and clear. Gorky’s interest in the Surrealist practice of spontaneous and unplanned ‘automatic’ drawing freed and mobilized his line, allowing him to create what Surrealist leader André Breton called ‘hybrids’, or linear units with multiple metaphoric meanings. - MoMA text on-line

heystacks

It just wouldn’t be Lowell George-day on OF without his trademark song Willin’. Here is a live version of Lowell duetting w. Linda Ronstadt - if you want the two studio versions Little Feat released, you’ll have to travel back in time three or four years, respectively, or you can hear the official LF live version here

Lowell George with Linda Ronstadt: Willin’ - from Live at WHFS bootleg, 1974

(via heystacks)

elimfcash

Growing up, as I did on a steady diet of 60s soul and r&b, plus the white equivalents of those types of music, one could not help but to love Little Feat, the great musicians’ musicians, whose funky and bluesy stomps and ballads were so incredible…

My affection fell mainly with the extraordinary singer, songwriter and slide guitarist Lowell George (April 13, 1945 - 1979), who tragically died of a massive heart attack at the too young age of 34. Lowell was always, and perhaps too much so, Willin’…

Lowell George: Cheek to Cheek - from Thanks, I’ll Eat It Here, 1979

(via elimfcash)

johnnykskim

Herbie Hancock, the versatile pianist, keyboardist and composer, who started as one of the primary post-bop piano players in Miles Davis’s ‘young’ quintet (with Ron Carter (b) and Tony Williams (dm) rounding out the rhythm section) in the early 60s, turns 74 today…

Herbie Hancock: A Tribute To Someone - from My Point of View, 1963

Personnel: Herbie Hancock – piano; Donald Byrd – trumpet; Grachan Moncur III – trombone; Hank Mobley – tenor saxophone; Grant Green – guitar; Chuck Israels – bass; Tony Williams – drums

(via johnnykskim)