Happy 95th to young Larry!
From The canticle of Jack Kerouac
6.

And then Ti-Jean Jack with Joual tongue
      disguised as an American fullback in plaid shirt   
          crossing and recrossing America
                                             in speedy cars   
    a Dr. Sax’s shadow shadowing him
      like a shroudy cloud over the landscape   
       Song of the Open Road sung drunken
               with Whitman and Jack London and Thomas Wolfe
            still echoing through
                            a Nineteen Thirties America   
                            A Nineteen Forties America   
                            an America now long gone
               except in broken down dusty old
                                              Greyhound Bus stations
                   in small lost towns
       Ti-Jean’s vision of America
                seen from a moving car window
                      the same as Wolfe’s lonely
                                                sweeping vision
                  glimpsed from a coach-train long ago
       (‘And thus did he see first the dark land’)   
And so Jack
                in an angel midnight bar
   somewhere West of Middle America
          where one drunk madonna
                        (shades of one on a Merrimac corner)   
      makes him a gesture with her eyes
                                                       a blue gesture   
          and Ti-Jean answers
                                       only with his eyes   
And the night goes on with them
       And the light comes up on them
                      making love in a parking lot

— Lawrence Ferlinghetti

 (photo by Harry Redl, San Francisco 1958)

Happy 95th to young Larry!

From The canticle of Jack Kerouac

6.
And then Ti-Jean Jack with Joual tongue
      disguised as an American fullback in plaid shirt   
          crossing and recrossing America
                                             in speedy cars   
    a Dr. Sax’s shadow shadowing him
      like a shroudy cloud over the landscape   
       Song of the Open Road sung drunken
               with Whitman and Jack London and Thomas Wolfe
            still echoing through
                            a Nineteen Thirties America   
                            A Nineteen Forties America   
                            an America now long gone
               except in broken down dusty old
                                              Greyhound Bus stations
                   in small lost towns
       Ti-Jean’s vision of America
                seen from a moving car window
                      the same as Wolfe’s lonely
                                                sweeping vision
                  glimpsed from a coach-train long ago
       (‘And thus did he see first the dark land’)   
And so Jack
                in an angel midnight bar
   somewhere West of Middle America
          where one drunk madonna
                        (shades of one on a Merrimac corner)   
      makes him a gesture with her eyes
                                                       a blue gesture   
          and Ti-Jean answers
                                       only with his eyes   
And the night goes on with them
       And the light comes up on them
                      making love in a parking lot
— Lawrence Ferlinghetti
(photo by Harry Redl, San Francisco 1958)
idroolinmysleep

We close Bach’s Birthday celebration on OF with twin posts of Glenn Gould doing what he did best - Bach’s Goldberg Variations. First the ‘near death’ recording from 1981, and last the glorious and unequaled youthful exuberance of the 1955 debut recording…

J.S. Bach: Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, Variations 16, 26, 30, and Aria (da capo)

Glenn Gould - piano (1981 recording)

(via idroolinmysleep)