It is harder to imagine a photographer whose aesthetics and purpose  of photography is further removed from that of Jacob Riis, than fellow  Danish-American William Mortensen…
William H. Mortensen - American art photographer (Jan. 1, 1897 - 1965): Self-Portrait as The Mad Hatter

It is harder to imagine a photographer whose aesthetics and purpose of photography is further removed from that of Jacob Riis, than fellow Danish-American William Mortensen…

William H. Mortensen - American art photographer (Jan. 1, 1897 - 1965): Self-Portrait as The Mad Hatter

Some of Jacob Riis’s work:
Mullen’s Alley (February 12, 1888) 
“There were  thousands of homeless children on the streets (of NYC), often abandoned  by their parents… and in the summer months 3-4 babies would suffocate  in the airless tenements every night.” — J.R.

Some of Jacob Riis’s work:

Mullen’s Alley (February 12, 1888)

“There were thousands of homeless children on the streets (of NYC), often abandoned by their parents… and in the summer months 3-4 babies would suffocate in the airless tenements every night.” — J.R.

Some of Jacob Riis’s work:
"Dens                  of Death" in New York City, 1890
"When the ‘dens        of death’ were in Baxter Street, big barracks crowded out the old shanties.        …I remember the story of those shown in the picture. They had been built        only a little while when complaints came to the Board of Health of smells        in the houses. A sanitary inspector was sent to find the cause. He followed        the smell down in the cellar, and digging there discovered the water pipe        was a blind. It had simply been run into the ground and was not connected        with the sewer." — J.R., How the Other Half        Lives

Some of Jacob Riis’s work:

"Dens of Death" in New York City, 1890

"When the ‘dens of death’ were in Baxter Street, big barracks crowded out the old shanties. …I remember the story of those shown in the picture. They had been built only a little while when complaints came to the Board of Health of smells in the houses. A sanitary inspector was sent to find the cause. He followed the smell down in the cellar, and digging there discovered the water pipe was a blind. It had simply been run into the ground and was not connected with the sewer." — J.R., How the Other Half Lives

In photography and photo-journalism, we celebrate the birthday of  Danish social activist, muckraker, journalist, lecturer and campaigner -  but first and foremost photographer, Jacob Riis (May 3, 1849 - 1914),  who emigrated to the US at age 21, expecting Broadway to be populated by  Comanches and buffaloes, but who found a far more disturbing truth  there. In 1891 he published his immensely influential book How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York documenting the horrendous conditions under which the immigrant population of the great metropolis lived and toiled…
Above: Portrait of Jacob Riis, c. 1900 by Frances Benjamin Johnston - Library of Congress

In photography and photo-journalism, we celebrate the birthday of Danish social activist, muckraker, journalist, lecturer and campaigner - but first and foremost photographer, Jacob Riis (May 3, 1849 - 1914), who emigrated to the US at age 21, expecting Broadway to be populated by Comanches and buffaloes, but who found a far more disturbing truth there. In 1891 he published his immensely influential book How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York documenting the horrendous conditions under which the immigrant population of the great metropolis lived and toiled…

Above: Portrait of Jacob Riis, c. 1900 by Frances Benjamin Johnston - Library of Congress

We celebrate playwright, novelist and screen writer William Inge (May 3,  1913 - 1973), whose dramatic work has been unjustly neglected for  decades. Works such as Picnic and Bus Stop are among Inge’s accomplishments…
Inge often addressed issues concerning homosexuality directly, or, more frequently indirectly, in his work. (His ironically titled one-act play The Tiny Closet is top-notch teaching material for classes getting introduced to queer theory and the analysis of gay and lesbian lit.) He, himself, led the life of a closeted gay man…

We celebrate playwright, novelist and screen writer William Inge (May 3, 1913 - 1973), whose dramatic work has been unjustly neglected for decades. Works such as Picnic and Bus Stop are among Inge’s accomplishments…

Inge often addressed issues concerning homosexuality directly, or, more frequently indirectly, in his work. (His ironically titled one-act play The Tiny Closet is top-notch teaching material for classes getting introduced to queer theory and the analysis of gay and lesbian lit.) He, himself, led the life of a closeted gay man…

Link Wray (May 2, 1929 - 2005) was one of the first Native American recording artists to produce a major hit (“Rumble” - 1958).
Link played a heavy, distorted lead guitar and his raw sound has  influenced power guitarists from Pete Townsend to Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page,  Jimi Hendrix, Marc Bolan, Neil Young and Bob Dylan.
Wray lived his last decades in Denmark and is buried in Copenhagen.
Photo of Link, Munich, 1977

Link Wray (May 2, 1929 - 2005) was one of the first Native American recording artists to produce a major hit (“Rumble” - 1958).

Link played a heavy, distorted lead guitar and his raw sound has influenced power guitarists from Pete Townsend to Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix, Marc Bolan, Neil Young and Bob Dylan.

Wray lived his last decades in Denmark and is buried in Copenhagen.

Photo of Link, Munich, 1977