Anne Brigman (Dec. 3, 1869 - 1950): The Dying Cedar, 1906 (Smithsonian)
Super-strange mythopoeic photography! 
"Anne W. Brigman, a late nineteenth-century pictorialist photographer, was born in Hawaii but spent most of her life in California. She used natural images combined with the female figure to create mysteriously poetic images. The Dying Cedar can be understood as a commentary on the grandeur and universality of nature—the oneness of woman and creation. More recently, the photograph has been seen as a statement of feminist principles, expressing a yearning for some sort of unattainable freedom. Brigman used cedar trees almost exclusively in her female nude images, but the reference to Daphne (the nymph pursued by Apollo who was saved by being transformed into a laurel tree) is unmistakable. Brigman was one of the first women to photograph nudes in a wilderness landscape. Her images deliberately resemble charcoal drawings, as she sought to capture the spirit of her subject rather than a faithful reproduction.” - National Museum of American Art (CD-ROM) (New York and Washington D.C.: MacMillan Digital in cooperation with the National Museum of American Art, 1996).

Anne Brigman (Dec. 3, 1869 - 1950): The Dying Cedar, 1906 (Smithsonian)

Super-strange mythopoeic photography! 

"Anne W. Brigman, a late nineteenth-century pictorialist photographer, was born in Hawaii but spent most of her life in California. She used natural images combined with the female figure to create mysteriously poetic images. The Dying Cedar can be understood as a commentary on the grandeur and universality of nature—the oneness of woman and creation. More recently, the photograph has been seen as a statement of feminist principles, expressing a yearning for some sort of unattainable freedom. Brigman used cedar trees almost exclusively in her female nude images, but the reference to Daphne (the nymph pursued by Apollo who was saved by being transformed into a laurel tree) is unmistakable. Brigman was one of the first women to photograph nudes in a wilderness landscape. Her images deliberately resemble charcoal drawings, as she sought to capture the spirit of her subject rather than a faithful reproduction.” - National Museum of American Art (CD-ROM) (New York and Washington D.C.: MacMillan Digital in cooperation with the National Museum of American Art, 1996).

  1. noirpk reblogged this from spectrumvivace
  2. sobredosisdecafeina reblogged this from spectrumvivace
  3. g4gti reblogged this from bardozone
  4. spectrumvivace reblogged this from bardozone
  5. bardozone reblogged this from i12bent
  6. t-s-k-b reblogged this from billyjane
  7. drakecaperton reblogged this from billyjane
  8. billyjane reblogged this from i12bent and added:
    i present you special edition of LL for tonight,i discovered by chance this author today,and the only other post...
  9. jadedhippy reblogged this from i12bent
  10. i12bent posted this
blog comments powered by Disqus